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18 Item(s)

  1. Panov Attack Caro-Kann defense (3 video series)
    $8.97
    GM Boris Alterman looks at the Panov-Botvinnik Attack against the Caro-Kann Defense - a line that can also be transposed to from many openings, including the Queen's Gambit and the Nimzo-Indian Defense The Panov-Botvinnik Attack has a unique important place in chess lore. After Capablanca adopted the Caro-Kann, it assumed a status as the solid way for Black to escape attacking efforts of e4 players. But Vasily Panov, a Soviet master, theoretician and Chess correspondent for Izvestia, took a different view of the situation and decided to test Blacks mettle with the direct action of 1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 c4. Mikhail Botvinnik picked up on this and quickly formed it into a potent weapon that has since become the choice of determined king pawn players. Learn More
  2. Albin Countergambit (3 video series)
    $8.97
    Invented nearly 90 years ago by the Austrian master Adolf Albin (1848-1920), the Albin counter-gambit (1 d4 d5 2 c4 e5!?) gives up a pawn for space in the center and is generally thought to be unsound - but Black has many tricks and traps to hold the balance. Learn More
  3. Central Attack Philidor Defence (3 video series)
    $8.97
    Central Attack Philidor Defence (3 video series) "Pawns are the soul of chess," once opined the mild-mannered 18th century French musical composer Francois-Andre Philidor, who was also the most famous chess-player of his day. Learn More
  4. Scandinavian Gambit (3 video series)
    $8.97
    The Scandinavian or Center Counter with 1 e4 d5 is one of the oldest asymmetric defenses in chess history, dating back to 1475. It became a theory backwater though for many years until it was revitalized and rechristened "the Scandinavian" due to it being adopted by Denmark's Bent Larsen, who defeated World Champion Anatoly Karpov with it. It is now extremely popular at club level, and particularly the line 1 e4 d5 2 exd5 Nf6, the so-called Marshall Gambit (or Scandinavian Gambit) after U.S. Champion Frank Marshall. And in this Gambit Guide series, GM Boris Alterman shows how the "Sizzling Scandinavian" can be a potent weapon for Black. Learn More
  5. Falkbeer Counter Gambit (3 video series)
    $8.97
    GM Boris Alterman explores a reliable counter to the King's Gambit with 1.e4 e5 2.f4 d5 3.exd5 e4, the Falkbeer Counter Gambit. Ever since 1850, when Ernst Falkbeer published his analysis, the Falkbeer Counter Gambit has been a theoretically important and reliable system against the King's Gambit. There is a certain spirit in this defense that not only thwarts Whites aims of quick development of the venerable gambit but is complicated by an offer of a pawn on d5. This spirit is consistent with the great attacking play of Anderssen and Morphy and their Falkbeer games can be found in many classic game collections. Learn More
  6. Traxler counter-attack (3 video series)
    $8.97
    GM Boris Alterman explores the tricky Two Knights Defense with the Traxler (or Wilkes-Barre) counter-attack with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6 4 Ng5 Bc5!? It's named after the Czech priest Karel Traxler, who first played a game in the line in 1890. However, it wasn't until Correspondence World champion Yakov Estrin wrote a famed book on the Two Knights some 80 years later that the main theory of the opening really developed. The idea is to ignore the early attack on f7 with the bold 4...Bc5!?, as a sacrificial blitz soon ensues. Learn More
  7. Blackmar-Diemer gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Blackmar-Diemer gambit (3 part series) ECO: D00: Blackmar gambit "Play the Blackmar-Diemer gambit and mate will come by itself!" so wrote Emil Diemer (1908-1990), as he refashioned an opening once played by Armad Blackmar (1826-1888), which came to bear both their names. Diemer was an average player who shot to fame in the fifties and sixties through the popularity of his opening with the masses, especially in Germany and the Netherlands. The BDG with 1. d4 d5 2. e4!? has a large following and it does indeed go for the jugular early, as white plays for mate from move two. And in his latest Gambit Guide series, GM Boris Alterman shows even today that the BDG can be just as lethal.tal. Learn More
  8. Cochrane Gambit (3 video series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman explores the Cochrane Gambit against the normally staid Petroff's Defence with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Nxe5 d6 4 Nxf7!? - an idea that stunned the chess world not only when it was first played in 1848, but also when Veselin Topalov resurrected it again in 1999 against Vladimir Kramnik at Linares. A swashbuckler by nature, 19th-century Scottish master John Cochrane (1798 - 1878) - who is also associated with the confusing naming history of the Scotch Game - was the epitome of the early romantic era of chess, and his legacy lives on through the centuries with his daring tactical idea that survives unrefuted to this day. The Cochrane Gambit involves the sacrifice of a knight as early as move four to lure out the opponent's king in a complex board full of pieces, whilst pushing forward in the center with a mobile armada of pawns. Learn More
  9. Goring Gambit (3 video series)
    $8.97
    GM Boris Alterman looks at the Goring Gambit, one of the most swashbuckling options for White in the Open Games after 1 e4 e5. It is fun, easy to learn and virtually unavoidable since White can deploy the crafty move order 2 d4 exd4 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 c3 to avoid the Petroff Defense and the Philidor Defense. Even today, the Goring Gambit is still a strong practical weapon where with best play Black achieves no more than equality. However, the lively attacking positions insure that White will have a lot of pressure, even against best play, and a slight error by Black can prove fatal. Learn More
  10. Budapest Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Budapest Gambit (3 part series) ECO: A52, A51: Budapest defense, Budapest defense declined GM Boris Alterman explores the Budapest Gambit (1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e5). The Budapest is popular with club and internet chess players all over the world, and it is easy to see why. It has surprise value, its not hard to learn, and it leads to sharp and dynamic play from the very start of the game. It was first played by Hungarian great Geza Maroczy at Budapest, 1896, but it was his fellow countrymen Abonyi, Barasz and Breyer who developed and popularized the opening in the early part of the 20th-century. While it is rarely seen at top level (though Mamedyarov deployed it in 2008 at the Amber tournament to beat Kramnik! Game HERE), it is not only solid and reliable, but you can also catch unaware opponents out in one of the myriad of opening traps to pick up a free win! Learn More
  11. Trompowsky Attack: Vaganian Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Trompowsky Attack: Vaganian Gambit (3 part series) ECO: A45: Trompowsky attack (Ruth, Opocenský opening) The Trompowsky Attack with 1 d4 Nf6 2 Bg5 - named after the Brazilian master, Octavio Trompowsky (1897-1984) - has risen from relative obscurity to become a popular opening due to its often wild complications. One of the key lines against the Tromp is 2 ..c5 3 d5 Qb6 where White has the option of the very aggressive Vaganian Gambit - named after the very strong Soviet player Rafael Vaganian, who played it in the early 1970s - with 4 Nc3!? Qxb2 Bd2. The idea is to activate all of white's pieces and make use of the open lines and space for an all-out attack. And in a new series of Gambit Guide for ICC Chess.FM, GM Boris Alterman evaluates the latest developments in the Vaganian Gambit. Learn More
  12. 4 knights Rubinstein (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: 4 knight's Rubinstein (3 part series) ECO: C48: Four knights: Rubinstein counter-gambit When the great "uncrowned king" Akiba Rubinstein introduced the variation that bears his name (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bb5 Nd4) into praxis at San Sebastian 1912, overnight the formal fearsome Spanish Four Knights, which up until then was a popular opening, went into rapid decline. And now, in the latest series of Gambit Guide, GM Boris Alterman shows why even today this is a good line to have in your arsenal, as the resulting pawn sacrifice allows Black to dominate the centre. Learn More
  13. Geller-Tolush Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Geller-Tolush Gambit (3 part series) ECO: D15: QGD Slav: Tolush-Geller gambit The Geller/Tolush Gambit (1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5 e4) has become enormously popular as a combative way for White to battle the solid Slav Defense, as White gives up the c-pawn for control of the center. The main ideas of the gambit was worked out by GM Alexander Tolush in 1947, and he played it against World Champion-to-be Vassily Smyslov during the USSR Championship of that year. But it was his fellow Soviet grandmaster (and noted theoretician) Efim Geller who worked the most to establish the gambit as a respectable opening by playing it consistently and finding many key improvements for White. Learn More
  14. Hennig-Schara Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Hector Gambit in Caro-Kann ECO: D32: QGD: Tarrasch, von Hennig-Schara gambit, QGD: Tarrasch, von Hennig-Schara gambit Boris Alterman explores an aggressive way to disarm the Queen's Gambit with 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 c5 4 cxd5 cxd4!?, the Hennig-Schara Gambit. It was first noted by Austrian master Anton Schara, who used it to defeat Ernest Gruenfeld during an offhand game at Vienna in 1918. Then ten years later, the relatively little-known German master Heinrich von Hennig picked up on Schara's published analysis to be the first to do any serious study of the gambit and introduced it into tournament praxis at Duisburg 1929. With the dynamic complexities of this early gambit against the normally solid Queen's Gambit, you can confuse and dismay many a 1 d4 players, creating excellent preconditions for winning chess - for Black! Learn More
  15. Kasparov gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Kasparov gambit (3 part series) ECO: B44: Sicilian, Szén (`anti-Taimanov') variation These day's there's not many world championship games ultimately decided on the strength of a gambit for black - but in his quest to become the youngest world champion in 1985, Garry Kasparov refined one as he demolished old foe Anatoly Karpov's Sicilian Szen variation (1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. c4 Nf6 7. Nb1c3 a6 8. Na3) with 8...d5!? - a move that totally flummoxed Karpov and his team of analysts'. The idea is simple: You sacrifice the d5 pawn for active piece play. It was thus reborn the 'Kasparov gambit' after Kasparov scored 1.5/2 with the black pieces during that world championship tussle - and the game he won, game 16, is hailed by many to be one of the best-ever world championship games. Since then though, refinements have been found that give White an edge. But in his latest Gambit Guide series, GM Boris Alterman believes that despite this, the Kasparov gambit it is still a good surprise weapon for Black to have in his arsenal. Learn More
  16. Hector Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Hector Gambit (3 part series) ECO: C68: Ruy Lopez: exchange variation The Ruy Lopez Exchange (or Spanish Exchange) was championed by two great world champions - first by Emmanuel Lasker as a secret weapon to take on the mighty Capablanca; and then arguably more famously by Bobby Fischer, who finely honed it by adding a cutting edge with his modern-day update of it in the 1960s. The concept of the opening is simple: Take all the pieces off the board and White wins the ending. But with the bishop pair, there are many ways for Black to counter the Exchange Lopez, and one enterprising way is to adopt an adventurous gambit made popular by the swashbuckling Swede, Jonny Hector, with 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Bxc6 dxc6 5 0-0 Bg4 6 h3 Bh5!? that features in a new three-part series for Gambit Guide. Learn More
  17. Taimanov/Flick-Knife Attack (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Taimanov/Flick-Knife Attack (3 part series) ECO: A67: Benoni: Taimanov variation In the Bible, Ben-Oni is the name Rachel gives her son as she lays dying in childbirth, and means “child of my sorrow” in Hebrew. And never has an opening in chess been more aptly associated with sorrow than the Benoni - especially nowadays, with the Taimanov variation (or the so-called ‘Flick-Knife Attack', as Dave Norwood graphically describes it in his 1994 book) almost proving to be the death knell for the Benoni. After 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 c5 3 d5 e6 4 Nc3 exd5 5 cxd5 d6 6 e4 g6 7 f4 Bg7 8 Bb5+, wild gambit play, sacrifices and all-out attack proves to be the order of the day in this aggressive line against the Benoni, and it features in a new series of Gambit Guide. Learn More
  18. Polugaevsky Gambit (3 part series)
    $8.97
    Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Polugaevsky Gambit (3 part series) ECO: E17: Queen's Indian: old main line, 6.O-O Lev Polugaevsky (1934-1995) was one of the strongest players in the world from the late 1960s until the early 1980s. He was the originator of the meticulous opening study style Kasparov was later on to perfect and bring to great heights.In a bruising 1980 candidates' match against Viktor Korchnoi, Polugaevsky scored a valuable win with a powerful opening novelty against the Queen's Indian Defence (1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 b6 3. g3 e6 4. Bg2 Be7 5. 0-0 Bb7 6. d4 0-0) that involved a pawn sacrifice with 7. d5!? - a line that subsequently was given the stamp of approval by Kasparov and christened the 'Polugaevsky Gambit'. And in his latest Gambit Guide series, GM Boris Alterman reviews the latest standing of the Polugaevsky Gambit. Learn More

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