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  1. Amateur Games: Sneaky Pins Missed Repeatedly
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Sneaky Pins Missed Repeatedly ECO: C33, Opening: King's Gambit Accepted 3Nc3 and 4 BC4 What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  2. Amateur Games: Was the loss inevitable
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Was the loss inevitable ECO: D00, Opening: 1.d4 d5: Unusual lines What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  3. Amateur Games: A Fighting Sveshnikov
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: A Fighting Sveshnikov ECO: B33, Opening: Sicilian: Pelikan and Sveshikov Variations What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  4. Amateur Games: Exposing King OK but Later Mistakes Fatal
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Exposing King OK but Later Mistakes Fatal ECO: B01, Opening: Scandivian Defence What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  5. Amateur Games: Unbalanced Game - Possible Upset
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Unbalanced Game - Possible Upset ECO: C44, Opening: Ponziani Opening and Scotch Gambit What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  6. Amateur Games: Galaxy Quest
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Galaxy Quest ECO: D20, Opening: Queen's Gambit Accepted, 3.e4 variation What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  7. Amateur Games: One Big Mistake
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: One Big Mistake ECO: A36, Opening: English: ultra-symmetrical variation What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  8. Amateur Games: Endgame Turnaround
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Endgame Turnaround ECO: B13, Opening: Caro-Kann What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  9. Amateur Games: Just for Fun Queen Sac
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Just for Fun Queen Sac ECO: D11, Opening: QGD Slav: Nf3 What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  10. Amateur Games: Solving an Endgame Puzzle
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Solving an Endgame Puzzle What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  11. Amateur Games: Typical Amateur Loss after up a piece
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Typical Amateur Loss after up a piece ECO: D91, Opening: Grünfeld What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  12. Amateur Games: 1900 plas fast and suffers upset
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: 1900 plas fast and suffers upset ECO: B23, Opening: Sicilian: Grand Prix Attack What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  13. Amateur Games: Invisible Moves and Sneaky Pins
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: Invisible Moves and Sneaky Pins What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  14. Amateur Games: King and 5 pawns vs King and 4 pawns
    $2.99
    Amateur Games: King and 5 pawns vs King and 4 pawns What's better than learning from one's errors? every coach or master tells us that we need to review our games, to learn from our own mistakes. NM Dan Heisman, in his series "Improve Your Chess", provides instruction by reviewing amateur games played on ICC and showing where the players went wrong and how to improve. In the learning process, it's useful to have a Master analyze amateur games, compare mistakes with good moves - often played in high-level games - and explain where thing went wrong. this series is a great way to improve your chess! Learn More
  15. Chess & Friendship (5 part series)
    $14.95
    Chess & Friendship (5 part series) ECO: C03, E90, E40, B04, A48, E11 Opening: French: Tarrasch, King's Indian: 5.Nf3, Nimzo-Indian: 4.e3, Alekhine's defense: modern, Larsen variation, King's Indian: Torre attack /Bogo-Indian defense, Nimzovich variation Players: Lukyanov, Yermolinsky, Mezentsev, Atalik, Yermolinsky, Bologan, Atalik, Blehm, Atalik, Yermolinsky, Yermolinsky, Shabalov, Yermolinsly, Khalifman Learn More
  16. Game of the Week: Torre, Byrne
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Torre, Byrne Tournament: 1973 Leningrad Iterzonal ECO: A00: Benko 1.g3 f5 Robert Byrne has passed away, one week short of his 85th birthday. One of the legends of U.S. chess history, Byrne was inducted into the US Chess Hall of Fame in 1994. Byrne spearheaded nine US teams in the Olympiad and won seven medals. He won the US Championship in 1972. He surely would have won a few more if not for Bobby Fischer dominating the Sixties. That title in 1972 was significant for me; it was the year I learned how to play chess, and the tournament book, “Title Chess,” was one of the first chess books I owned. Byrne followed with a top finish in the Leningrad Interzonal which made him a championship candidate. Alas, he went down at the hands of his friend and frequent tennis opponent, Boris Spassky. This week I will examine a game from Leningrad, in which Byrne defeats Eugenio Torre. Forty years later Torre is still playing at a good level, but back then he was just starting his long career. Robert Byrne was a good friend, and I will miss him dearly. Learn More
  17. Game of the Week: Robson, Bryant
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Robson, Bryant Tournament: US Championship 2013 (Rd2) ECO: C45: Scotch game The 2013 U.S. Championship returned to a 24-player Swiss system format. I think most fans would consider the tournament a great success, with a good mix of older and younger players having good results. That battle was reflected in the final decision as 38-year-old Gata Kamsky took the “Armageddon” game from 24-year-old Alejandro Ramirez to register his fourth U.S. title and his third in the city of St. Louis. Slightly further down you see 56-year-old Larry Christiansen and 49-year-old Joel Benjamin turn back the clock with plus scores. 19-year-old Conrad Holt and Kayden Troff, who turned fifteen during the event, dazzled with 5.5 and 5 points respectively. It was interesting to see how newcomers like Holt and Troff, as well as John Bryant and 12-year old Sam Sevian put the test to more established young stars like Ray Robson, Sam Shankland, and Robert Hess. In our featured game we see Robson and Bryant, two kids who are happy to plunge into complications, negotiate a landmine of tactics on the cusp of the time control. Let’s take a look and see who made the fatal misstep. Learn More
  18. Game of the Week: Rodshtein, Nepomniachtchi
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Rodshtein, Nepomniachtchi Tournament: 14th European Individual Chess Championship ECO: E60: King's Indian: Unusual lines and Fianchetto Variation without Nc3 The European Individual Championship, as always, reeled in an enormous number of grandmasters hoping to qualify for the World Cup. When Alexander Moiseenko, the leader for nearly the entire event, was toppled in the last round by Ian Nepomniachtchi, an extraordinary ten way tie for first ensued, with all players on 8/11. Special kudos has to go to Alexander Beliavsky, who will now supplant our own Larry Christiansen as the oldest player in the World Cup. Most of the decisive games I played over seemed to be technical affairs. A notable exception was Nepomniachtchi’s encounter with Israeli grandmaster Maxim Rodshtein. A cutting edge opening variation led to an unusual unbalanced position that was quickly mishandled by one of the players. It’s short, but it’s sweet. Let’s take a look. Learn More
  19. Game of the Week: Pelletier, Hagen
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Pelletier, Hagen Tournament: 14th European Individual Chess Championship ECO: E97: King's Indian:Classical Main Line In a tournament as big as the European Individual Championship it’s possible to overlook incredible games played on the lower boards. The battle between the experienced Swiss grandmaster Yannick Pelletier and the unknown Danish IM Andreas Hagen was in many ways a typical King’s Indian, but when you see the position after move fifty, you will surely agree that it is anything but typical. Watch and be prepared for an explosion in the latter stages of the game. Learn More
  20. Game of the Week: Hoyos, Robson
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Hoyos, Robson Tournament: US National Open 2013 ECO: A10: English Opening: Unusual replies for Black In American Open tournaments, you have a lot to think about in the last round. If you are in the leading group, it is so tempting to draw and guarantee a share of first prize, avoiding the heavy stress of a last-round game in the process. On the other hand, big ties can greatly dilute that prize. In the recently completed 2013 National Open in Las Vegas, Mexican grandmaster Manuel Leon Hoyos, and young American star Ray Robson commendably duked it out in the last round, each hoping to take home the pot of gold. Learn More
  21. Game of the Week: Areshchenko, Karpov
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Areshchenko, Karpov Tournament: Sberbank Rapid Kiev ECO: B01: Scandinavian Defense It’s good to see Anatoly Karpov play chess, even if he is a long way from the great player he used to be. In the Sberbank Rapid tournament in Kiev, Karpov tried out some new opening strategy. In our featured game, he finds himself under heavy pressure from Ukrainian grandmaster Alexander Areshchenko. Areshchenko sacrificed a pawn early for long-term pressure, forcing Karpov to try to resuscitate his old defensive skills. Learn More
  22. Game of the Week: Ponomariov, Eljanov
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Ponomariov, Eljanov Tournament: 82nd ch-Ukraine 2013 Kiev ECO: C91: Closed Ruy-Lopez: 7…d6 8 c3 0-0 9 d4 It’s good to see Anatoly Karpov play chess, even if he is a long way from the great player he used to be. In the Sberbank Rapid tournament in Kiev, Karpov tried out some new opening strategy. In our featured game, he finds himself under heavy pressure from Ukrainian grandmaster Alexander Areshchenko. Areshchenko sacrificed a pawn early for long-term pressure, forcing Karpov to try to resuscitate his old defensive skills. Learn More
  23. Game of the Week: Moiseenko, Vachier-Lagrave
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Moiseenko, Vachier-Lagrave Tournament: Biel 2013 ECO: D85: Exchange Grünfeld: Unusual White 7th moves and lines with 7Nf3 The old Soviet expression “first among equals” comes to mind when seeing the results from the traditional Biel grandmaster round-robin, which was dubbed the Breisacher Memorial in honor of the event’s organizer who passed away just after last year’s event. The leaderboard shifted dramatically at the end with a most unusual result of four of the six players tied for first! In the ensuing playoff, Etienne Bacrot and Ding Liren were eliminated in the first round, and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave vanquished Alexander Moiseenko in the final to take the title. In the main portion of the competition, the roles were reversed when the top two finishers met in the ninth round. There were some interesting opening ideas and instructive potential endgames, but in the end an attack decided the game. Learn More
  24. Game of the Week: Robson, Volokitin
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Robson, Volokitin Tournament: World Cup 2013 ECO: C42: Petrov Four of the nine Americans advanced to the second round in the Fide World Cup in Norway, but none more spectacularly than 19-year-old Ray Robson. Robson scored a convincing 2-0 victory over the higher rated Andrei Volokitin of the Ukraine. The first game was a particular gem. Robson used some clever opening preparation to put Volokitin in less familiar territory, than smoked him with some well-calculated tactics. Let’s have a look and enjoy. Learn More
  25. Game of the Week: Thomashevsky, Aronian
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Thomashevsky, Aronian Tournament: World Cup 2013 Tromso ECO: E10: Blumenfeld Gambit As we recover from the hangover of the World Cup, this week we turn our attention to the Karpov Poikovsky tournament in the Ukraine. Typically this tournament does not feature a lot of decisive games, with a lot of conservative openings and cautious play. Our feature game does not fit into that category, as Viktor Bologan and Ian Nepomniachtchi discussed an unusual opening that led to a lot of fur flying before the result was decided. Let’s take a look. Learn More
  26. Game of the Week: Bologan, Nepomniachtchi
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Bologan, Nepomniachtchi Tournament: 14th Karpov GM Poikovsky 2013 ECO: E60: King's Indian: Unusual lines and Fianchetto Variation without Nc3 As we recover from the hangover of the World Cup, this week we turn our attention to the Karpov Poikovsky tournament in the Ukraine. Typically this tournament does not feature a lot of decisive games, with a lot of conservative openings and cautious play. Our feature game does not fit into that category, as Viktor Bologan and Ian Nepomniachtchi discussed an unusual opening that led to a lot of fur flying before the result was decided. Let’s take a look. Learn More
  27. Game of the Week: Espinoza Aranda, Salgado Lopez
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Espinoza Aranda, Salgado Lopez Tournament: Ch-Esp 2013 Linares ECO: B43 : Sicilian: Kan Variation: 5 Nc3 22-year-old Ivan Salgado Lopez won the Spanish Championship with a 7 ½- 1 ½ score. It was a Swiss system event, and some of his opponents were not very strong. Still, he showed a technical mastery of his stronger opponents, too. He beat Miguel Illescas in a rook and bishop ending with four pawns versus three, all on the same side. I would have thought it to be a draw, until I saw how Salgado won it. In this week’s featured game, he wins a smooth game without any fireworks against an international master of about the same age, Angel Espinosa Aranda. I quite like this game because its shows how the player with the better understanding of the strategy of the Open Sicilian will emerge on top. Let’s watch and learn. Learn More
  28. Game of the Week: Libiszewski, Edouard 
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Libiszewski, Edouard  Tournament: Spanish Team Championship 2013 ECO: B90: Sicilian: Najdorf: Unusual White 6th moves, 6 Be3 Ng4 and Be3 e5 France led the European Team Championship wire to wire until the last round. Russia dealt the French their first match loss, allowing Azerbaijan, who tied with Armenia, to slip past them into first place. France held on for silver while Russia edged out Armenia for bronze. For the Azeris, Shakhiyar Mamedyarov had an unspectacular +1 result, but he came up big in the sixth round against Baadur Jobava of Georgia. Jobava, one of the most original players on the scene, had an excellent result with five wins against two losses, but he could not find the answers to Shak Mammy’s enterprising and defiant opening strategy. Learn More
  29. Game of the Week: Eliseev, Yu Yangyi
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Eliseev, Yu Yangyi Tournament: 52nd World Juniors 2013 Kocaeli ECO: B48 : Sicilian: Taimanov: 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 without Be2 Yu Yangyi has become the first Chinese World Junior Champion. That’s a little surprising, considering the prodigies that country has produced in the last several years. The top seed dominated the field with an impressive 11/13, 9 wins and four draws. Alexander Ipatov made a strong bid for his second World Junior title, but his +8 score left him a half-point short. Yu showed good patience and a variety of skills in racking up that big score. This week we will focus on his win over Russian grandmaster Urii Eliseev. The opening went straight into the endgame; after safeguarding his position from possible attacks, Yu went on the offensive. From then on, the white king never felt safe despite the limited material. Learn More
  30. Game of the Week: Andreikin, Karjakin
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Andreikin, Karjakin Tournament: Russian Superfinals 2013 ECO: E12: Queen's Indian: Unusual White 4th moves It’s a cool time for chess fans as three major events are taking place simultaneously. The Russian Superfinal boast most of the usual suspects, including Kramnik and multiple champion Svidler. In the first round two grandmasters representing Russia’s present and future squared off. Dmitry Andreikin and Sergey Karjakin explored new wrinkles in an opening that was highly favored by a former king of Russian chess, Garry Kasparov. Let’s see how it turned out. Learn More
  31. Game of the Week: Nisipeanu, Caruana
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Nisipeanu, Caruana Tournament: Kings 2013 Bucharest ECO: D90: Grünfeld: 4Nf3 Bg7 sidelines The King’s Tournament in Romania has lost some of its luster due to financial issues, but even with just five players it is an interesting event. Fabiano Caruana came fresh from his not-quite-complete success in the Paris Grand Prix where his equal first was not quite enough to qualify for the next Candidates tournament. Despite just a couple of days separating the two events, Caruana came ready for action in the first round versus L.D. Nisipeanu. The long battle included a new wrinkle on hot opening theory, a nearly successful mating attack, and finally, a little endgame technique. Peripatetic and industrious, Fabiano is clearly more than “recreational Caruana.” Learn More
  32. Game of the Week: Matlakov, Eljanov
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Matlakov, Eljanov Tournament: Chigorin Memorial St Petersburg 2013 ECO: E35: Nimzo-Indian: Classical: 4…d5 5.cxd5 exd5 Pavel Eljanov was first among equals at the Chigorin Memorial, besting ten other players on tiebreak with 7/9. Eljanov is a solid player, which we will see in his approach from this week’s featured game. But when his opponent, the strong young grandmaster Maxim Matlakov, is lulled into a false sense of security, Eljanov strikes with a lightning attack. It just goes to show that to play attacking chess, one does not necessarily need to steer into sharp channels in the opening. Learn More
  33. Game of the Week: Morozevich, Laznicka
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Morozevich, Laznicka Tournament: Euroclub 2013 Rhodes ECO: A00 : Benko The European Club Cup saw a surprise winner as the Czech team G-Team Novy Bor rode a crucial victory over defending champions SOCAR to take first prize with six match victories and one tie. In the fourth round match with ultimate second place finishers Malachite, the Czech third board Viktor Laznicka contested a fascinating game with Russian grandmaster Alexander Morozevich. In the cold light of the computer we see quite a few mistakes were made, but in such a bizarre position, I for one would not be too quick to judge. Let’s just enjoy it instead. Learn More
  34. Game of the Week: Shankland, Ftacnik
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Shankland, Ftacnik Tournament: 18th Casino de Barcelona 2013 ECO: D70 : Grünfeld: Unusual White 3rd moves Meet me at the CASBAR. That’s what Sam Shankland could have said as he took part in the Casino de Barcelona tournament. It was good to see the young American grandmaster get an opportunity to play in a fairly high level round-robin international. Sam fell a little short of the desired first place finish, blundering in a drawn endgame he was trying to win in the last round. But earlier he produced a strong effort against the veteran Slovakian grandmaster Lubomir Ftacnik. Shankland’s aggressive approach and confident determination were on display as he overcame his opponent’s tenacious resistance. Learn More
  35. Game of the Week: Goudriaan, Timmann
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Goudriaan, Timmann Tournament: Tata Steel tournament ECO: E53: Nimzo-Indian The Tata Steel tournament is one the celebrated events on the calendar, but I always enjoy watching the B Group, too. It always has an interesting mix of not quite A-level players, young rising stars, and still competitive veterans. In that last category we find 62-year-old Jan Timman turning back the clock with a fine score of 8 ½-4 ½, a 2686 performance. Timman finished a point and a half behind first place finisher Ivan Saric (whose performance was quite noteworthy, too), but could have made it more interesting if he hadn’t faltered late in games down the stretch. Anyone who has ever read Timman’s deep analysis in books or magazines knows that he welcomes complications. In his victory over young IM Etienne Goudriaan, Timman deflected the kitchen sink and other pieces thrown at him with accurate calculation. Learn More
  36. Game of the Week: Vachier-Lagrave, Mareco
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Vachier-Lagrave, Mareco Tournament: Gibraltar Masters ECO: B47: Sicilian:Taimanov The Gibraltar Masters served as a good comeback result for mercurial grandmaster Vassily Ivanchuk, who played his last several games on board one. However, he was caught in the last round by Nikita Vitiugov and Ivan Cheparinov, all with scores of 8-2. In a bizarre elimination playoff where the player with the worst tiebreaks got a bye to the finals, Cheparinov took the title and a good chunk of extra cash. French star Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, known affectionately to his many fans as MVL, fell a bit short after a spirited draw with Ivanchuk in the last round, but he did produce a stirring attacking game in round five. His victim, Argentine grandmaster Sandro Mareco, was the surprise leader at the time, having opened up with four straight wins. MVL often earns high praise for his attacking play, and though there were some hidden possibilities that might have altered the result, he did make it look surprisingly easy. Learn More
  37. Game of the Week: Maiorov, Ding Liren
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Maiorov, Ding Liren Tournament: Cappelle-la-Grande Open ECO: E32: Nimzo-Indian It takes more than attacking prowess and tactical acumen to reach the 2700 mark. Endgame technique is an essential weapon in the grandmaster arsenal, and often wins need to be squeezed from endgames that are not clearly decided at the outset. In the game between Nikita Mairov and Ding Liren from the traditional Cappelle-la-Grande Open, the players played out a scenario that can be seen in any open tournament. The lower rated player tried to hang on for dear life in the endgame while the higher rated player patiently pursued every avenue to improve his position. How to exploit a long term advantage is just one of the lessons learned here. Another equally useful one is that when playing stronger opponents who we might be content to draw with, it is still a good idea to try to throw a few punches. Learn More
  38. Game of the Week: Quingnan, Yangyi
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Quingnan, Yangyi Tournament: Chinese Chess championship 2014 ECO: B47: Sicilian: Taimanov The Chinese Championship lacked some of China’s biggest stars like Wang Hao, Wang Yue, and Li Chao. But the favorites delivered, with second-seeded Yu Yangyi taking the title on tiebreaks over top seed Ding Liren. The winning score was a relatively modest 7/11. The 19-year-old went undefeated and notched a nice win over Liu Qingnan. Yu pounced on a mistake to initiate tactics, obtaining a winning advantage with some very aesthetic moves. Learn More
  39. Game of the Week: Nepomniachtchi, Svidler
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Nepomniachtchi, Svidler Tournament: Russian Team Championship ECO: C45: Scotch When I was eight-years-old, my uncle showed me the classic game Hamppe-Meitner from 1872. The White king was lured forward by a series of sacrifices and nearly pulled into the corner originally occupied by Black’s queen’s rook. Meitner tried to organize a mate with the limited material he had left. Well, a game just played in the Russian Team Championship forcibly recalled that game. Svidler’s king went for a walk along the lines of Herr Hamppe. While Nepomniachtchi had a queen on the board, the wandering king still proved to be surprisingly elusive. It’s possible that the whole thing was opening preparation for one or both players…no matter, it still stands as an instant classic, one that will entertain and intrigue future generations. Learn More
  40. Game of the Week: Hou yifan, Girya
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: Hou yifan, Girya Tournament: Women’s Grand Prix ECO: B49: Sicilian: Taimanov As the dominant male in the chess world, Magnus Carlsen, racked up another tournament victory in the Gashimov Memorial, World Champion Hou Yifan confirmed that she is the dominant female with a convincing victory in the Women’s Grand Prix in Khanty Mansiysk. Her score of 8 ½ out of 11 put her a point and a half clear of the field. The result of the second place finisher, however, was a surprise. Despite being one of the tournament’s lowest rated competitors, the 22-year old Russian WGM Olga Girya notched 7 points and an apparent grandmaster norm. With a highly successful youth career behind her, Girya looks to have a promising future. But in this week’s feature game, Hou Yifan sends the message that she herself owns the present. Learn More
  41. Game of the Week: David, Vachier-Lagrave
    $2.99
    Game of the Week: David, Vachier-Lagrave Tournament: Italian Team Championship ECO: A15: English From the start of this week’s featured game from the Italian Team Championship, you might expect a long, positional struggle. But a quiet opening does not always bring about a quiet game. The veteran grandmaster Alberto David may have thought he was neutralizing the often heavy punch of Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, but he needed a bit more vigilance to keep MVL from going on the attack. Learn More
  42. Tkachiev's Takeout!
    $2.99
    Tkachiev's Takeout! ECO: D37: QGD: 4.Nf3 Players: Tkachiev, Balogh Learn More
  43. Berg "Burns" Bareev
    $2.99
    Berg "Burns" Bareev ECO: C11: French: Burn variation Players: Berg, Bareev Learn More
  44. Keeping the tension as Wang Ices Berg
    $2.99
    Keeping the tension as Wang Ices Berg ECO: A32: Queen's pawn game Players: Wang, Berg Learn More
  45. Risky Business by Bologan
    $2.99
    Risky Business by Bologan ECO: C78: Ruy Lopez: Möller defense Players: Bologan, Stefanova Learn More
  46. Counter-attack by Hou Yifan
    $2.99
    Counter-attack by Hou Yifan ECO: C13: French: Albin-Alekhine-Châtard attack Players: Smeets, Hou Yifan Learn More
  47. Don't back down vs GMs!
    $2.99
    Don't back down vs GMs! ECO: B03: Alekhine's defense: exchange variation Players: Rusan, Luther Learn More
  48. Flying pieces at Aeroflot!
    $2.99
    Flying pieces at Aeroflot! ECO: E92: King's Indian: Gligoric-Taimanov system Players: Evdokimov, Bologan Tournament: Moscow 2008 Learn More
  49. The Flying Pieces of Aeroflot!
    $2.99
    The Flying Pieces of Aeroflot! ECO: A61: Benoni: Nimzovich (knight's tour) variation Players: Evdokimov, Volokitin Tournament: Moscow 2008 Learn More
  50. The winner never lets go!
    $2.99
    The winner never lets go! ECO: C90: Ruy Lopez: closed Players: Sutovsky, Miton Learn More

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