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  1. The one and only Turkish Schoolboy (2 part series)
    $5.98
    The one and only Turkish Schoolboy Opening: D76, A87: Grunfeld, Dutch Player(s): Atalik, Wiwatanadate, Dzhumaev, Learn More
  2. Vancura Lives! (2 part series)
    $5.98
    Vancura Lives! Opening: : Player(s): Aronian, Carlsen Learn More
  3. A complicated endgame from the European Club Cup
    $2.99
    A complicated endgame from the European Club Cup Opening: : Player(s): Dominguez, Rodshtein Learn More
  4. They’re all good chessplayers!
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    They’re all good chessplayers! Opening: : Player(s): Aronian, Carlsen, Can, Laurusas Learn More
  5. All American Opposite Bishops Endgame
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    All American Opposite Bishops Endgame Opening: E20: NImzo-Indian Player(s): Kamsky, Lenderman Today GM Alex Yermolinsky, continuing his great endgames lectures, analyses for us an opposite color bishops endgame played in a game between Gata Kamksy and Alexander Lenderman. Learn More
  6. Chinese Chess
    $2.99
    Chinese Chess Opening: C67: Ruy Lopez Player(s): Yi, Liren Learn More
  7. Not only Wei Yi. Strong Chinese GMs charge the top spots (2 part series)
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    Not only Wei Yi. Strong Chinese GMs charge the top spots Opening: C65, E10: Ruy Lopez: Berlin defense, Queen's Pawn Game Opening: C65, B33: Ruy Lopez: Berlin defense, Sicilian defense Player(s): Yu Yiangyi, Bruzon, Nepomniachtchi, Dominguez Perez Learn More
  8. The Goldilocks Principle (2 Part series)
    $5.98
    The Goldilocks Principle Opening: B41: Sicilian: Kan variation Opening: A04: Reti Opening Player(s): Yandemirov, Zvjaginsev, Popov, Solozhenkin Learn More
  9.  Searching for a new Russian Schoolboy (2 Part series)
    $5.98
    Searching for a new Russian Schoolboy Opening: D43, D16: Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, Slav Defense: Alapin Variation Player(s): Khalifman, Bukavshin, Kobalia Learn More
  10.  World Cup 2015 (3 Part series)
    $8.97
    World Cup 2015 Opening: : Player(s): In this new series of his acclaimed show "Every Russian Schoolboy Knows!", GM Alex Yermolinsky offers us his insight on the recently concluded FIDE World Cup. Learn More
  11. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Knight endgames (2 Part series)
    $5.98
    Knight endgames Opening: : Player(s): Yermolinsky, Drasko, Gurevich Learn More
  12. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: What Every Russian Schoolboy Studies These Days (2 Part series)
    $5.98
    Knight endgames Opening: : Player(s): Yermolinsky, Drasko, Gurevich Learn More
  13. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Coulda, Shoulda, Woulda (5 Part series)
    $14.95
    Coulda, Shoulda, Woulda Opening: A13, A28, A34: English, English: four knights system, English: Symmetrical Variation Player(s): Salov, Jussupow, Van Wely Learn More
  14. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: A triumph of opening preparation.
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    A triumph of opening preparation. Opening: E66: King's Indian: fianchetto - Yugoslav Panno Player(s): Vukic, Atalik Learn More
  15. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Grischuk - Anand, London Classic 2015
    $2.99
    Grischuk - Anand, London Classic 2015 Opening: A20: English opening Player(s): Grischuk, Anand Learn More
  16. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Another Epic Struggle from London 2015
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    Another Epic Struggle from London 2015 Opening: D11: QGD Slav: 4.e3 Player(s): Carlsen, Nakamura Learn More
  17. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: The Botvinnik Variation Revisited
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    The Botvinnik Variation Revisited Opening: : Player(s): Tomashevsky, Sethuraman, Sarkar, Mulyar Learn More
  18. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Viktor Gavrikov (1957-2016)
    $2.99
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Viktor Gavrikov (1957-2016) Opening: : Player(s): Gavrikov Learn More
  19. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - Rauzer Attack  - (5 videos)
    $14.95
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire Opening: B67: Sicilian Defence: Richter-Rauzer - Rauzer Attack A 5 videos series Learn More
  20. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - French Armenian Variation - (2 videos)
    $5.98
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire - French Armenian Variation Opening: C18: French Defense - Armenian Variation Learn More
  21. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - Caro-Kann (4 videos)
    $11.96
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire - Caro-Kann Opening: B12: Caro-Kann Learn More
  22. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - QGD ( 8 videos)
    $23.92
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire - QGD Opening D37: QGD Learn More
  23. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - Same color Bishop (4 videos)
    $11.96
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire - Same color Bishop Endgame Learn More
  24. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows:  Build you opening repertoire - Opposite color Bishop (4 videos)
    $11.96
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build you opening repertoire - Opposite color Bishop Endgame Learn More
  25. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: A Tribute to GM Tseshkovsky (3 videos)
    $8.97
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: A Tribute to GM Tseshkovsky Opening: B05: Alekhine defense Player(s): Tseshkovsky, Hort Learn More
  26. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build your opening repertoire -  Offbeat e4 lines  (2 videos)
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    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build your opening repertoire - Offbeat e4 lines Opening: C45: Scotch Game B51: Sicilian, Canal-Sokolsky (Nimzovich-Rossolimo, Moscow) attack Player(s): Yermolinsky, Kretchetov, Luther, Danailov, Sandipan, Fressinet, Cheparinov Learn More
  27. Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build your opening repertoire - KID Averbakh  (10 videos)
    $29.90
    Every Russian Schoolboy Knows: Build your opening repertoire - KID Averbakh Opening: E73: E74, E75 Player(s): Lerner, Yermolinsky, Atalik, Agzamov, Yermolinsky, Glyanets, Lputian, Moskalenko, Yermolinsky, Basin, Yermolinsky, Sharafuddin, Kaidanov, Kamsky, Polugaevsky, Uhlmann The Averbakh System, along with its variants such the Petrosian Variation in the Classical (early d4-d5) and the unnamed h3...Bg5 system, represents a shift in White's approach to combatting the Kings Indian. No series on the Averbakh KID can be complete without some coverage of the classical games in the Symmetrical Benoni structure (parts 7-8), but there are some new development there as well (parts 9-10) Enjoy! Learn More
  28. Repertoire for Black - The French (21 part series)

    Regular Price: $49.95

    Special Price $29.95

    Repertoire for Black - The French (21 part series)
    COMES WITH ONE (1) MONTH OF BONUS ICC MEMBERSHIP Learn More
  29. Game of the Week: Tkachiev, Dobrov
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    Game of the Week: Tkachiev, Dobrov Tournament: Meurthe et Moselle Festival Rapid ECO: A51: Budapest Gambit declined In the Meurthe and Moselle Festival Rapid tournament in Nancy, France, most of the usual suspects made it through the prelims into the sixteen player knockout. But a dark horse emerged, as Vladimir Dobrov knocked out Etienne Bacrot, Yannick Pelletier, and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave to make it into the finals. Dobrov met his match in the finale; Vladislav Tkachiev is not only a strong, experienced grandmaster but a specialist at fast time controls as well. In the decisive encounter, Tkachiev built up an attack and let the pieces fly, producing a spectacular and entertaining attack. Learn More
  30. Game of the Week: Kramnik, Ivanchuk
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    Game of the Week: Kramnik, Ivanchuk Tournament: FIDE Candidates Tournament 2103 ECO: E10: Queen's Pawn Game 3.Nf3 Through much of the FIDE Candidates tournament in London, Vladimir Kramnik found full points frustratingly hard to come by. It wasn’t for lack of trying, or even creating opportunities. Aronian barely escaped with a draw against him in round five, and Carlsen was fortunate to hold in round nine. This week we will feature Kramnik’s round six encounter with Ivanchuk. Kramnik typically found tactical possibilities out of the normally placid Catalan opening, while Ivanchuk played his usual game of “beat the clock.” Learn More
  31. Game of the Week: Svidler, Grischuk
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    Game of the Week: Svidler, Grischuk Tournament: FIDE Candidates Tournament 2013 ECO: E81: King's Indian, Sämisch, 5...O-O As we catch our breath and try to recover from the incredible finish to the FIDE Candidates tournament that had servers and websites around the world crashing under the weight of immense numbers of viewers, we will have one more look at an exciting game that did not receive game of the week coverage. Nearly buried beneath the story of Carlsen’s nervous but barely sufficient finish and Kramnik’s heroic second half charge (until the final round) was the fine result of Peter Svidler, who went from middle of the pack to a half-point from the top spot. In the final context, out featured game takes on more significance. In any case, the battle between Svidler and Alexander Grischuk from round nine stands on its own, a mind-bending morass of complications with both players showing great ingenuity. Let’s try to make some sense of what happened that day. Learn More
  32. Game of the Week: Morozevich, Jakvenko
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    Game of the Week: Morozevich, Jakvenko Tournament: Russian Team Championship 2013 ECO: D16: QGD; Slav accepted, Alapin Variation The Russian Team Championship has started up, with veterans of the FIDE Candidates tournament Svidler and Grischuk joining many of the top names in Russian chess. In this week’s game we take a look at the mercurial Alexander Morozevich battling another established grandmaster, Dmitry Jakovenko. The two revisited a sharp opening from a previous encounter, producing hard to evaluate positions and interesting hidden tactical possibilities. Let’s see how it went down. Learn More
  33. Game of the Week: Torre, Byrne
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    Game of the Week: Torre, Byrne Tournament: 1973 Leningrad Iterzonal ECO: A00: Benko 1.g3 f5 Robert Byrne has passed away, one week short of his 85th birthday. One of the legends of U.S. chess history, Byrne was inducted into the US Chess Hall of Fame in 1994. Byrne spearheaded nine US teams in the Olympiad and won seven medals. He won the US Championship in 1972. He surely would have won a few more if not for Bobby Fischer dominating the Sixties. That title in 1972 was significant for me; it was the year I learned how to play chess, and the tournament book, “Title Chess,” was one of the first chess books I owned. Byrne followed with a top finish in the Leningrad Interzonal which made him a championship candidate. Alas, he went down at the hands of his friend and frequent tennis opponent, Boris Spassky. This week I will examine a game from Leningrad, in which Byrne defeats Eugenio Torre. Forty years later Torre is still playing at a good level, but back then he was just starting his long career. Robert Byrne was a good friend, and I will miss him dearly. Learn More
  34. Game of the Week: Svidler, Harikrishna
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    Game of the Week: Svidler, Harikrishna Tournament: Bundesliga 2012-13 ECO: D36: QGD: exchange, positional line, 6.Qc2 Recently it seems that Peter Svidler is everywhere. We know he was making Magnus Carlsen miserable at the FIDE Candidates on April Fool’s Day; we know he continued on to the Russian Team Championship, where his team took the title. And we know he made his way to Paris for the Alekhine Memorial. But somewhere in between, the peripatetic Russian stopped in Germany to complete the 2012-2013 Bundesliga season. The powerhouse Baden-Baden team finished off a perfect season, winning all fifteen matches. Svidler contributed with an intriguing game on the last weekend of the season. Learn More
  35. Game of the Week: Topalov, Leko
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    Game of the Week: Topalov, Leko Tournament: FIDE GP Zug ECO: D38: QGD : Ragozin System Peter Leko is probably not a great fan favorite, as he has a pretty conservative style. But he is not afraid to defend, and when you pair him with a fearless attacker like Topalov, sparks often fly. In the second round of the Zug Grand Prix the two contested a super sharp game that could have ended very differently if time pressure did not rear its ugly head. Learn More
  36. Game of the Week: LiChaob, Zhou Weigi
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    Game of the Week: LiChaob, Zhou Weigi Tournament: Chinese Championship 2013 ECO: D15: Slav Defence:4 Nc3 a6 and gambit lines after 4Nc3 dxc4 The Chinese Championship lacked a couple of stars, notably Wang Hao and Liren Ding, but still presented a formidable round-robin field. Wang Yue, the top rated and best known player, took first comfortably, but we will feature a game from 24-year-old Li Chao, Wang Yue’s good friend and occasional coach. Against Zhou Weiqi, Li Chao produced an opening novelty that soon led into a highly tactical endgame, with subtle errors ultimately making the difference. Learn More
  37. Game of the Week: Robson, Bryant
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    Game of the Week: Robson, Bryant Tournament: US Championship 2013 (Rd2) ECO: C45: Scotch game The 2013 U.S. Championship returned to a 24-player Swiss system format. I think most fans would consider the tournament a great success, with a good mix of older and younger players having good results. That battle was reflected in the final decision as 38-year-old Gata Kamsky took the “Armageddon” game from 24-year-old Alejandro Ramirez to register his fourth U.S. title and his third in the city of St. Louis. Slightly further down you see 56-year-old Larry Christiansen and 49-year-old Joel Benjamin turn back the clock with plus scores. 19-year-old Conrad Holt and Kayden Troff, who turned fifteen during the event, dazzled with 5.5 and 5 points respectively. It was interesting to see how newcomers like Holt and Troff, as well as John Bryant and 12-year old Sam Sevian put the test to more established young stars like Ray Robson, Sam Shankland, and Robert Hess. In our featured game we see Robson and Bryant, two kids who are happy to plunge into complications, negotiate a landmine of tactics on the cusp of the time control. Let’s take a look and see who made the fatal misstep. Learn More
  38. Game of the Week: Rodshtein, Nepomniachtchi
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    Game of the Week: Rodshtein, Nepomniachtchi Tournament: 14th European Individual Chess Championship ECO: E60: King's Indian: Unusual lines and Fianchetto Variation without Nc3 The European Individual Championship, as always, reeled in an enormous number of grandmasters hoping to qualify for the World Cup. When Alexander Moiseenko, the leader for nearly the entire event, was toppled in the last round by Ian Nepomniachtchi, an extraordinary ten way tie for first ensued, with all players on 8/11. Special kudos has to go to Alexander Beliavsky, who will now supplant our own Larry Christiansen as the oldest player in the World Cup. Most of the decisive games I played over seemed to be technical affairs. A notable exception was Nepomniachtchi’s encounter with Israeli grandmaster Maxim Rodshtein. A cutting edge opening variation led to an unusual unbalanced position that was quickly mishandled by one of the players. It’s short, but it’s sweet. Let’s take a look. Learn More
  39. Game of the Week: Pelletier, Hagen
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    Game of the Week: Pelletier, Hagen Tournament: 14th European Individual Chess Championship ECO: E97: King's Indian:Classical Main Line In a tournament as big as the European Individual Championship it’s possible to overlook incredible games played on the lower boards. The battle between the experienced Swiss grandmaster Yannick Pelletier and the unknown Danish IM Andreas Hagen was in many ways a typical King’s Indian, but when you see the position after move fifty, you will surely agree that it is anything but typical. Watch and be prepared for an explosion in the latter stages of the game. Learn More
  40. Game of the Week: Kamsky, Grischuk,
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    Game of the Week: Kamsky, Grischuk, Tournament: 14th European Individual Chess Championship ECO: A48 : 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6: Torre, London and Colle Systems Down the stretch of the FIDE Grand Prix in Thessaloniki, Greece, three players were writing compelling stories. In a dramatic last round, Fabiano Caruana took down the leader, Gata Kamsky, thus equaling his score of 7.5/11. Neither player could ultimately celebrate as Lenier Dominguez pushed through the open door with an endgame squeeze from Veselin Topalov. The Cuban grandmaster’s score of 8/11 netted first place in his greatest result to date. The three at the top showed a higher level than the others, though in any long tournament there will be many missed opportunities along the way. Kamsky, who forged his lead with an opening win over Dominguez and a 4.5/5 spurt just before the end, will certainly regret some moves from the finale, but he can also lament the missed opportunity against Alexander Grischuk in round four. Taking advantage of his opponent’s mistaken timing, Kamsky forged a surprising early attack but found the decisive blow unexpectedly elusive. Learn More
  41. Game of the Week: Hoyos, Robson
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    Game of the Week: Hoyos, Robson Tournament: US National Open 2013 ECO: A10: English Opening: Unusual replies for Black In American Open tournaments, you have a lot to think about in the last round. If you are in the leading group, it is so tempting to draw and guarantee a share of first prize, avoiding the heavy stress of a last-round game in the process. On the other hand, big ties can greatly dilute that prize. In the recently completed 2013 National Open in Las Vegas, Mexican grandmaster Manuel Leon Hoyos, and young American star Ray Robson commendably duked it out in the last round, each hoping to take home the pot of gold. Learn More
  42. Game of the Week: Sanikidze, Landa
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    Game of the Week: Sanikidze, Landa Tournament: French team League ECO: D37 : QGD: 5 Bf4 In the final weekend of the French Team League, Tornike Sanikidze and Konstantin Landa battled it out in one of the sharpest opening variations known to man. Apparently on new territory on move 15, the game saw a lot of ups and downs before a violent end on move 38. That’s right; no exciting draw this week. Blood is spilled…let’s see whose it turns out to be. Learn More
  43. Game of the Week: Areshchenko, Karpov
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    Game of the Week: Areshchenko, Karpov Tournament: Sberbank Rapid Kiev ECO: B01: Scandinavian Defense It’s good to see Anatoly Karpov play chess, even if he is a long way from the great player he used to be. In the Sberbank Rapid tournament in Kiev, Karpov tried out some new opening strategy. In our featured game, he finds himself under heavy pressure from Ukrainian grandmaster Alexander Areshchenko. Areshchenko sacrificed a pawn early for long-term pressure, forcing Karpov to try to resuscitate his old defensive skills. Learn More
  44. Game of the Week: Ponomariov, Eljanov
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    Game of the Week: Ponomariov, Eljanov Tournament: 82nd ch-Ukraine 2013 Kiev ECO: C91: Closed Ruy-Lopez: 7…d6 8 c3 0-0 9 d4 It’s good to see Anatoly Karpov play chess, even if he is a long way from the great player he used to be. In the Sberbank Rapid tournament in Kiev, Karpov tried out some new opening strategy. In our featured game, he finds himself under heavy pressure from Ukrainian grandmaster Alexander Areshchenko. Areshchenko sacrificed a pawn early for long-term pressure, forcing Karpov to try to resuscitate his old defensive skills. Learn More
  45. Game of the Week: Reinderman, Spoelman
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    Game of the Week: Reinderman, Spoelman Tournament: ch-NED Amsterdam 2013 ECO: B51: Sicilian: Moscow Variation (3Bb5+) Without 3…Bd7 The 2013 Dutch Championship is missing some of its biggest names like Giri, van Wely, and Tiviakov, but that gives the younger generation of grandmasters an opportunity to show off their skills. Here we see one of them, 23-year-old Wouter Spoelman, in action against a more experienced grandmaster, 40-year-old Dmitri Reinderman. The opening led to a position of competing weaknesses, which was hard to evaluate well into the middlegame. Then, a dramatic turn led to a swift conclusion. Let’s have a look. Learn More
  46. Game of the Week: Ni Hua, Iturrizaga
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    Game of the Week: Ni Hua, Iturrizaga Tournament: 33rd Benasque Open 2013 ECO: B40: Sicilian, Quiet openings do not have to signal a boring game is coming. Sometimes one player or the other may just wish to avoid a duel of opening theory, with every intention of battling it out to the fullest. We can see that in this week’s skirmish from the Benasque Open in the heart of the Pyrenees. Ni Hua and Eduardo Iturrizaga both took the sharpest course on a number of occasions, which increased the chances of a decisive result, and an entertaining game for ICC fans. Learn More
  47. Game of the Week: Mikhalevski, Negi
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    Game of the Week: Mikhalevski, Negi Tournament: 41st Annual World Open Arlington 2013 ECO: A37: Symmetrical English vs …g6: 4Bg2 Bg7 5Nf3 One thing that separates strong players from ordinary ones is the knowledge that material is not everything. Most players will automatically reject variations in which they lose a pawn or an exchange if they do not see a short-term benefit. In our feature game from the World Open, young Indian star Parimarjan Negi had a very nice looking position in the middlegame. Israeli grandmaster Victor Mikhalevski needed to somehow change the course of the game, and he found a positional sacrifice to keep the position on edge throughout. Learn More
  48. Game of the Week: Robson, Shanglei
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    Game of the Week: Robson, Shanglei Tournament: Yinzhou Cup CHN-USA Rapid Ningbo 2012 ECO: B96: Sicilian Najdorf: 6Bg5 e6 7f4 lines other than 7…Qb6 and 7…Be7 The USA-China match in Ningbo resulted in a lopsided victory for the very young home team. Both squads were quite young, with only two Americans born before the eighties, and no Chinese players older than 27. But we will focus on one particular game, a resounding victory for Ray Robson over his fellow teenager, Lu Shanglei. In a sharp Najdorf variation Robson found an idea to challenge the conventional wisdom of a position, and send future opponents in search of an improvement. Learn More
  49. Game of the Week: Moiseenko, Vachier-Lagrave
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    Game of the Week: Moiseenko, Vachier-Lagrave Tournament: Biel 2013 ECO: D85: Exchange Grünfeld: Unusual White 7th moves and lines with 7Nf3 The old Soviet expression “first among equals” comes to mind when seeing the results from the traditional Biel grandmaster round-robin, which was dubbed the Breisacher Memorial in honor of the event’s organizer who passed away just after last year’s event. The leaderboard shifted dramatically at the end with a most unusual result of four of the six players tied for first! In the ensuing playoff, Etienne Bacrot and Ding Liren were eliminated in the first round, and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave vanquished Alexander Moiseenko in the final to take the title. In the main portion of the competition, the roles were reversed when the top two finishers met in the ninth round. There were some interesting opening ideas and instructive potential endgames, but in the end an attack decided the game. Learn More
  50. Game of the Week: Robson, Volokitin
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    Game of the Week: Robson, Volokitin Tournament: World Cup 2013 ECO: C42: Petrov Four of the nine Americans advanced to the second round in the Fide World Cup in Norway, but none more spectacularly than 19-year-old Ray Robson. Robson scored a convincing 2-0 victory over the higher rated Andrei Volokitin of the Ukraine. The first game was a particular gem. Robson used some clever opening preparation to put Volokitin in less familiar territory, than smoked him with some well-calculated tactics. Let’s have a look and enjoy. Learn More

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