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Grünfeld Gambit (5 part series)

Grünfeld Gambit (5 part series)
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Boris Alterman's Gambit Guide: Grünfeld Gambit (5 part series)

ECO: D84, D85: Grünfeld: Grünfeld gambit accepted, Grünfeld: exchange variation

The Grünfeld Defence (named after the Austrian hypermodern master Ernst Grünfeld, 1913-1961) is a dynamic and popular weapon for players who look to counterattack with the black pieces. It is no wonder then that it became a particular favorite of former World Champions Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov. Part 1: Boris takes a closer looks at three critical gambit lines in the Grünfeld Defence, first up being the Grünfeld Gambit Accepted with 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 Bf4 Bg7 5 e3 OO 6 cxd5 Nxd5 7 Nxd5 Qxd5 8 Bxc7. Part 2: Boris takes a closer look at three critical gambit lines in the Grünfeld; the second of which being one of the big main lines of the Exchange variation with 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 7 Bc4 c5 8 Ne2 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0 10 0-0 Bg4 11 f3 Na5 12 Bd3 cxd4 13 cxd4 Be6 14 d5 Bxa1 15 Qxa1 - an exciting exchange sacrifice credited to the ever-inventive David Bronstein, who first played it on the big stage during the Budapest Interzonal of 1950.
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The Grünfeld Defence (named after the Austrian hypermodern master Ernst Grünfeld, 1913-1961) is a dynamic and popular weapon for players who look to counterattack with the black pieces. It is no wonder then that it became a particular favorite of former World Champions Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov. Part 1: Boris takes a closer looks at three critical gambit lines in the Grünfeld Defence, first up being the Grünfeld Gambit Accepted with 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 Bf4 Bg7 5 e3 OO 6 cxd5 Nxd5 7 Nxd5 Qxd5 8 Bxc7. Part 2: Boris takes a closer look at three critical gambit lines in the Grünfeld; the second of which being one of the big main lines of the Exchange variation with 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 7 Bc4 c5 8 Ne2 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0 10 0-0 Bg4 11 f3 Na5 12 Bd3 cxd4 13 cxd4 Be6 14 d5 Bxa1 15 Qxa1 - an exciting exchange sacrifice credited to the ever-inventive David Bronstein, who first played it on the big stage during the Budapest Interzonal of 1950.
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